Node.js

The rising popularity of JavaScript has carried with it many improvements and today’s landscape of web development is dramatically different. The stuff we can do on the web today with JavaScript running on the site, as well as in the application, were difficult to imagine just a few years ago, even encapsulated in sandboxed settings such as Flash or Java Applets.

In a single sentence: Node.js shines over websockets in real-time web applications utilizing push technology. What is it that is so revolutionary? Okay, after more than 20 years of stateless-web based on the stateless request-response model, we finally have web applications with real-time, two-way communications, where both client and server may initiate contact, enabling them to openly exchange data. This is in sharp contrast to the typical network response paradigm, where contact is always facilitated by the recipient. In fact, it’s all based on the open web stack (HTML , CSS and JS) running across the regular 80 channel.

Node.js’ main idea: use non-blocking, event-driven I / O to remain lightweight and efficient when confronted with data-intensive real-time applications running across distributed devices. How that also means say is that Node.js is not a silver-bullet modern technology that controls the field of web growth. It’s just a forum that meets a common need.

You certainly don’t want to use Node.js for CPU-intensive operations; using it for heavy computation would annul almost all of its obvious benefits. Where Node really shines is in building fast , scalable network applications, so that’s equipped to handle a huge number of concurrent connections with high throughput.

It is pretty interesting how this operates under-the-hood. Node.js acts as a single thread, using non-blocking I / O calls, helping it to accept tens of thousands of concurrent connections kept in the event loop compared to traditional web-serving approaches where each link creates a new thread, taking up machine RAM before ultimately maxing-out at the amount of RAM accessible.

Now a very popular question regarding node.js- is it used for front-end or backend? Node.js is effectively a runtime environment for Chrome built on the V8 Javascript engine, implying that Javascript can be omitted from a browser’s execution background. To draw a very vague analogy, Node.js is to Javascript, which is what JRE is to Java, (although not a very appropriate comparison). How you would like to leverage Node.js is dependent on you. Since it can operate Javascript outside a window background and also has the ability to run a non-blocking I / O-based HTTP server (with the aid of Http libraries) that it offers out of the box, it can be used in back-end/server-side scenarios.

Also you can use Node.js in the front end so as to simplify your daily tasks including construct, running unit tests of your front end code. Frameworks like Grunt, Gulp, Bower exploit features in Node.js so as to improve and enhance the software development.

Even actually Angular 2 uses Node.js to install packages and compile Typescript to Javascript. Therefore, Node.js can be used in both front-end and back-end scenarios in practice, but in essence it has been developed to serve the purpose where Javascript can be used on the server side to develop web applications, resulting in a single language for both front-end and back-end development.

Also you can use Node.js in the front end so as to simplify your daily tasks including construct, running unit tests of your front end code. Frameworks like Grunt, Gulp, Bower exploit features in Node.js so as to improve and enhance the software development.

Even actually Angular 2 uses Node.js to install packages and compile Typescript to Javascript. Therefore, Node.js can be used in both front-end and back-end scenarios in practice, but in essence it has been developed to serve the purpose where Javascript can be used on the server side to develop web applications, resulting in a single language for both front-end and back-end development.

Hope this helps.

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